Roadway Improvement Construction Plans

Roadway Improvement Construction Plans

Stonefield does not believe in the “quick-fix” road widening solely to add vehicular capacity and meet a Level of Service criteria. Instead, we look to how a roadway width could be best utilized for all modes of transportation. Adding new through lanes in most cases will just add more vehicles to the roadway, whereas adding space for bike lanes, wider sidewalks for pedestrians, bus facilities, and median boulevard islands can add to the sense of place and create a shift in transportation modal choice.

Angled Parking Design

February 03 2016
Angled Parking Design

Angled parking stalls offer a user-friendly and efficient method for on-street parking along wide roadways like the one shown. Angled parking also adds a traffic calming measure along wider roadways where motorists are likely to drive at higher speeds.  Stonefield utilizes techniques, including field survey and observations and data collection, in order to understand the specific characteristics of a development area and ultimately design roadway and parking plans that mesh well with the surroundings. 




 

Landscaped Median

January 18 2016
Landscaped Median

Landscaped medians are not only an instrument in roadway beautification, but are also a tool in roadway safety.  Medians are used to create physical barriers between opposing traffic and can also act as a refuge for pedestrians crossing wider roadways.  Stonefield utilizes roadway design elements, like medians, when tackling roadway safety concerns. 






 

Roadway Communication

January 15 2016
Roadway Communication

Communication is the most basic yet vital skill humans need to live.  When confined inside of a vehicle, we lose our ability to communicate with one another in traditional way and are forced to use other means.  The use of proper roadway signage is an important component in communicating traffic information to drivers.  Communication is a key factor in Stonefield’s success and a skill we continue to improve. 






 

Pedestrian Signal Heads

December 15 2015
Pedestrian Signal Heads

Pedestrian signals effectively reduce congestion as well as successfully complete more pedestrian crossings.  Signal heads should be placed conveniently in the area where pedestrians wait to cross.  Stonefield offers an expertise in preparing traffic signal and intersection plans, in compliance with ADA standards.  We have placed traffic signal installations at a number of intersections throughout the New Jersey region. 





 

Street Corner

December 01 2015
Street Corner

Curb extensions provide additional pedestrian space and a shorter crossing distance for pedestrians.  Traffic calming devices and traffic safety measures are always a consideration in Stonefield’s design approach to intersection construction.  Brick pavers add texture and an interesting touch to the urban streetscape. 






 

Sidewalks, Walkways, and Public Spaces

November 29 2015
Sidewalks, Walkways, and Public Spaces

Walking is the oldest mode of transportation – it is the most common form and it’s free! Sidewalk construction is an integral component in building more active cities.  Well-designed sidewalk spaces can make walking more attractive, facilitate more physical activity, and reduce traffic congestion.  We are motivated by pedestrian-oriented developments and Stonefield always incorporates sidewalk design and pedestrian safety when preparing roadway and intersection construction plans. 





 

Safe Street Crossings

November 23 2015
Safe Street Crossings

Pedestrian safety is a primary concern when designing street crossings.  Pedestrian crossing signals, push buttons for pedestrian actuated signals, and ramps emphasize safety at crosswalks.  Stonefield always considers pedestrian safety when designing roadways and improving intersections.  Promoting pedestrian friendly areas helps establish vibrant and sustainable communities. 





 

Traffic Calming Solutions

November 03 2015
Traffic Calming Solutions

Traffic calming devices are placed on roadways to reduce or slow-down vehicule traffic to improve pedestrian and cyclist safety.  Pedestrian safety is always a concern Stonefield takes into consideration when preparing roadway improvement and construction plans.  In this photo, speed bumps and low speed limit signs are installed to improve the safety conditions along this local residential street. 






 

Exclusive Lanes

October 20 2015
Exclusive Lanes

Exclusive turning-movement lanes are installed to provide for additional traffic capacity and to facility turning movements.  This exclusive right-turn lane removes stopped vehicles from through traffic and has the potential to reduce rear-end collisions.  Stonefield’s experience in preparing intersection design, construction, and roadway improvement plans prove to provide more efficient traffic systems throughout the Northeast, like the one shown. 




 

Fresh Pavement

October 05 2015
Fresh Pavement

Sometimes all a street needs is a fresh new coat of pavement. Applying a smooth layer of asphalt can help reduce traffic delay and congestion.  Stonefield’s experience with roadway and intersection design projects range from constructing new concrete sidewalk to large corridor improvement projects.  Our portfolio includes many intersection improvement programs throughout the Northeast region. 





 

Relics of our past

September 15 2015
Relics of our past

Relics of our past, after 70 years of usefulness, brick buildings like this one, if not repurposed, will be succumbing to redevelopment.  Always looking for a better purpose for the land, municipalities move forward as developers look for the next set of investments.  At Stonefield, we are looking to help make each project a successful one.  Stonefield works with a municipalities to create redevelopment plans that has a vision and impact that can be mitigated and accounted for as well as work with a developer to design a truly dynamic place and expedite the entitlement process.  So whether it is reuse, raze and rebuild, or just planning, Stonefield is designing for the next 70 years or more. 



 

Guidebooks as a Reference

September 03 2015
Guidebooks as a Reference

Stonefield Engineers have designed many of the roads you drive on every day.  We are experts in designs that meet AASHTO, MUTCD, ADA, NACTO, and local jurisdictional standards.  Stonefield does not cut corners, but we are strong proponents of context sensitive design, knowing that every project should be designed to fit its particular surroundings.  This may mean thinking outside the box and performing an additional calculation, but when safety can be combined with place-making, it’s very valuable to know which guidebooks to refer to. 




 

Edgewater Traffic Design

August 15 2015
Edgewater Traffic Design

Edgewater, like most of North Jerseys Gold Coast has seen a major reversal of its land value in the past 20 years.  Originally a boom of development when the ports and ferries dominated the Hudson Coastline was later left in ruins following the changing of the industrial and transportation sectors of the regions.  Remains of old industrial shells such as this gas line overpass still exists, but piece by piece, buoyed by mass transportation options and one-of-a-kind views, the North Jersey Gold Coast has been redeveloped.  Planned developments of retail, office, residential, primarily in mixed-use environments have been the latest boom to the region.  Stonefield is at the forefront of transportation network design in these communities, proposing new light rail stations, park-and-rides, new ferry service, and complete streets within mixed-use developments.  Stonefield preaches that density does not have to mean congestion when supported by proper transportation options. 


 

Designing with Impact

July 14 2015
Designing with Impact

A clean slate for the roundabout/traffic circle.  For decades it was miscast into a purpose (especially in New Jersey) of a high speed, major highway connection instead of its true calling, providing mobility for low and mid volume roads in downtowns, rural areas, and in our retail cores.  No need for long left-turn bays or out of the way jughandles, instead you get an ever progressing stream of traffic, letting left-turns, u-turns, right turns all safely occurring one after another.  At a roundabout, everyone is equal, cars wait their turn and accelerate through that magical center circle.  At Stonefield we look at roundabouts as a major tool in our toolbox.  Roundabouts help build connectivity, create a sense of space, and keeps traffic moving. 



 

Design Constraints

July 10 2015
Design Constraints

At Stonefield we have been successful designing roadway projects with a multitude of constraints such as Right-of-Way, Utility, Drainage, Historical, Cost, but sometimes we get to start from scratch and leave a footprint of our work for the next decades to enjoy.  This brand-new roundabout benefits both is a showcase piece in a major development that will both bring in tax revenue to the municipality, but also thanks to the properly designed roundabout, the development will actually reduce delays on the proximate roadway network. 




 

Urban Streetscapes

July 01 2015
Urban Streetscapes

Public spaces can be reinvented through art and design.  Stonefield supports the exploration of unique tactics to create vibrant streetscapes in urban communities.  As you can see, a little creativity and some paint can really roar an outdoor space to life. 






 

Wayfinding

June 24 2015
Wayfinding

Traveling along the flag lined road, you are approaching an unfamiliar intersection at 30, 35, 40 miles per hour.  Waze is telling you to get ready to turn…but where?  Which lane should you be in? Will there be kids crossing the road?  What cute little downtown are you approaching? All of this information, is not at your fingertips, but it is all in front of your eyes.  Your brain, seeing these familiar lane markings, MUTCD signs, wayfinding markers, quickly processes this information and and keeps you moving at your target speed.  How does a designer like Stonefield know where and when to put down lane markings and signs?  Years of experience and handy manuals like the MUTCD.  Uniformity breeds safety. 




 

Below the Surface

May 02 2015
Below the Surface

Everyone just sees the surface, the asphalt overlay, or sometimes pothole ridden concrete top course.  But what is hidden underneath is typically a maze of utilities.  Each company fighting to provide service to their wanting customers, but all underneath your roadway.  The local MUA with a water main, sanitary sewer lines, telephone and high voltage duct banks, gas lines.  You may see a manhole every once in a while, but at Stonefield we are familiar with all that is going on underneath the surface.  We peel back those mysteries and design our roadway plans with a full understanding that if you want something above ground to look great, you need to understand what is going on underground. 





 

Complete Streets

April 01 2015
Complete Streets

Roads belong to all users, not just cars.  Just in this picture along you can see the colorful palate of potential of lane markings providing simple instructions for all of the road users.  Pedestrians, your mom and dads push strollers, marathon trainers using the tan sidewalk.  Then inside the curb line, bicyclists using their well earned patch of green paint signifying their lane.  Then the vehicles speed by, guided by the familiar white and yellow.  When do you use white paint? When do you use green?  Which direction should the hatching go in the center median?  When is a bike lane appropriate?  Those are all answers Stonefield can give, providing our clients guidance and creating space for all. 

 

Consider All Users

March 31 2015
Consider All Users

Stonefield does not believe in the “quick-fix” road widening solely to add vehicular capacity and meet a Level of Service criteria.  Instead, we look to how a roadway width could be best utilized for all modes of transportation.  Adding new through lanes in most cases will just add more vehicles to the roadway, whereas adding space for bike lanes, wider sidewalks for pedestrians, bus facilities, and median boulevard islands can add to the sense of place and create a shift in transportation modal choice.